Research

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Learn a New Language to Boost Brain Activity

A new study, published in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, shows that studying a new language boosts brain activity, which then reduces as language skills improve, so, if you want to keep your brain in top shape, the best advice is to keep adding to your linguistic repertoire. “In the first few months, you can quantitatively…

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Bilingual Infants Prefer Baby Talk

Babies pay more attention to baby talk than regular speech, regardless of which languages they’re used to hearing, according to a study led by Krista Byers-Heinlein, a psychology professor at Concordia University in Montreal, involving 17 labs in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, and Singapore. The study, published by Advances in Methods and Practices in…

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Naked Rats Communicate Complexly

Front view of a Naked Mole-rat, hairless rat Birds, dolphins, and bees are all well-known within the scientific community for their ability to communicate in ways that resemble human language in one manner or another. Now, scientists can add another species to the list of animals with complex communication faculties: the naked mole rat. According…

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Naked Mole Rats Communicate Complexly

Front view of a Naked Mole-rat, hairless rat Birds, dolphins, and bees are all well-known within the scientific community for their ability to communicate in ways that resemble human language in one manner or another. Now, scientists can add another species to the list of animals with complex communication faculties: the naked mole rat. According…

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Where Do Students Store New Vocabulary?

A study on word learning recently published in Neuropsychologia is shedding light on the age-old question of how language learners’ minds store the target language. Researchers at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile found that new words in the native language and the target language are stored in largely overlapping regions of the brain; however,…

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What Language Does Pain Speak?

A new study suggests that the language a bilingual person speaks may affect their physical sensations, including pain. Researchers at the University of Miami tried to discover if the ways we express feelings, such as pain, love, or joy, in various languages resulted in differences in the sensations themselves. They asked, “Would a painful event…

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How COVID-19 is Reshaping Translation & Interpretation

COVID-19 has changed the world irrevocably, forcing the translation and interpretation industry to rapidly adopt digital technology and tools to reduce the disruption of day-to-day operations.  Since early March, multinational corporations and international associations have had to turn global, face-to-face events into online video conferences. While frontline workers are undoubtedly the heroes of this crisis,…

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Research Reveals Children’s Linguistic Superpower

The top row shows the left hemisphere brain activity by age with the bottom row showing right hemisphere activity at the same age. Orange/yellow patches are the areas of activity when listening to sentences. Infants and young children have brains with a linguistic superpower, according to Georgetown University Medical Center neuroscientists, who found that unlike…

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Young Bilingual Brains May Age Better

Bilingual children and adolescents may grow up with more grey matter, according to a new study published in Brain Structure and Function, in which an international team of academics led by the UK’s University of Reading and the U.S. Georgetown University examined detailed scans of children’s and adolescents’ brains and found that bilingual participants had…