Monthly Archives: April 2021

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Iran Reduces Kurdish Teacher’s Sentence

Zara Mohammadi, a Kurdish language teacher and linguistic advocate in Iran who was sentenced to ten years in prison for her work, has recently had her sentence reduced to five years. According to Rudaw, a Kurdish news network, Mohammadi’s sentence reduction comes as Iran faces mounting pressure from the international community over suppression of the…

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LRA Releases Report on Dyslexia Research

In response to the growing national attention around dyslexia in both the government and the media, the Literacy Research Association (LRA) has released a report entitled, “An Examination of Dyslexia Research and Instruction.” The report, authored by University of Albany professors Peter Johnston and Donna Scanlon, outlines the current state of dyslexia-related research with a…

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Early Language Acquisition in COVID Lockdowns

Extensive research during the COVID-19 pandemic has shown its effect on the way we talk and engage with our language, like the introduction of new words like “quaranteam” or the increased frequency of other vocabulary items like words for “hand sanitizer” and “quarantine.” Now, researchers are looking into the effects of the pandemic on not…

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CUP Announces Regional Winners of Global Teacher Appreciation Award

Cambridge University Press (CUP) has announced six regional winners in the 2021 Dedicated Teacher Awards, an international competition honoring outstanding educators. This year, there were a record-breaking 13,000 nominations from 112 countries–more than double the amount of nominations last year. This year’s winners are: Peggy Pesik – Sekolah Buin Batu International School (Indonesia)Nonhlanhla Masina –…

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Take Poverty out of the Literacy Equation for Good

The federal economic stimulus package passed last month achieves something progressives have dreamed of for decades: monthly assistance for families in poverty with no application process, work requirements, nor restrictions on how the money is spent. This should result in an enormous improvement in educational outcomes for our most disadvantaged children as long as it…

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First Canadian Bachelor’s Degree in Nsyilxcn

The University of British Columbia (UBC) Okanagan is on track to become the first university in Canada to offer an undergraduate degree in Indigenous language fluency. The Bachelor of Nsyilxcn Language Fluency (BNLF) is the product of years of collaboration between UBC, the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology, and the En’owkin Centre. Nsyilxcn is a…

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Pre-K Quality Stalls in NYC

Young children from low-income New York City families—many of them Black and Latinx—face continued disadvantages resulting from lower-quality preschools despite the mayor’s program to close racial disparities in early learning, says a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. Early childhood education centers enrolling larger shares of white or Asian American children…

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See It, Say It

There is an old adage that says a picture is worth a thousand words. Compelling photographs have captured the highs and lows of a century’s worth of historical events as well as the everyday experiences of ordinary people. Photographs of universal human experiences solicit lots of spoken language and emotions. Think about how often sharing…